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  1. #21
    Senior Member Angra Mainyu's Avatar
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    might be safe to work the fuck out of your hamstrings and glutes doin pullthroughs/ghr/reverse hyper

    also dont even do a leg extension, ive never hurt my knees but actually feel joint pain just doing them, probably the worst fucking exercise of all time, you are basically putting yourself in a BJJ leg lock trying to break your knee
    Last edited by Angra Mainyu; 2017-09-22 at 04:04 PM.
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  2. #22
    Senior Member Blahblah's Avatar
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    Leg extensions + heavy squats = busted knees

    Just a matter of when.

  3. #23
    Senior Member Jason Blaha's bulging red speedo's Avatar
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    I should get my results soon. I'll post them for fun.

  4. #24
    Senior Member Freudian Slip's Avatar
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    yeah dont do leg extensions whether you have an injury or not
    i wonder if behind the back deadlifts, aka hack squats would be ok

  5. #25
    Junior Member healthguy1's Avatar
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    Really sorry to hear that. you better wait for the x-ray results.

  6. #26
    🐲 Destroyer of worlds 🐉 Shabbatai's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Blaha's bulging red speedo View Post
    I have pain in both knees, severe enough that I'm afraid to jump, run, squat or kneel. I am waiting for the x-ray and MRI results. I am meeting my doctor in three weeks. It's hard to pinpoint, but I think the pain is in the front of the knees (patellar issues?).

    It is really messing up my training. I am afraid to squat or even deadlifts. What leg exercises should I do instead that will give me some benefit without straining the knees? Or should I just wait for the results and recommendations of the doctor? I feel like waiting is deteriorating me...

    pull a lenny and start eating eggs with the shell (wash em and boil em first)

    srs theres studies done about this its incredible

    egg shell + green tea + curcumin is hello android joints
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  7. #27
    Senior Member Jason Blaha's bulging red speedo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shabbatai View Post
    pull a lenny and start eating eggs with the shell (wash em and boil em first)

    srs theres studies done about this its incredible

    egg shell + green tea + curcumin is hello android joints

    I think Lenny eats the eggs raw!

    Heard good stuff about turmeric. Thinking of starting my curcumin racket ("Curry-cels" could be the trademark).

    The results show a bit of wear and tear on the cartilage in both knees but does not seem serious. Very little ligament trauma and no laxity. Some swelling and a quadriceps tendinopathy on my right knee. Orthopedist appointment in two weeks. We'll see what she says!

  8. #28
    Senior Member Jason Blaha's bulging red speedo's Avatar
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    Results are in.

    Left knee: some swelling (Baker's cyst) and ligament damage that has healed. Knee stable, no pain. Cyst is asymptomatic. No treatment required.

    Right knee: bone contusion (bruise) that has healed, little ligament damage that has healed, knee very stable but quadriceps tendinopathy that causes pain. Physiotherapy required.

    At home:
    So basically I massage the knee lightly, apply ice and do some exercises : lying on floor on my back, extending the leg with toes upturned, leg elevated with back of knee on a support, then tensing the leg and pushing the whole leg as to lower it towards the floor. First month every day, 2nd month with a small weight , 3rd month heavier weight, doing this for the rest of my life.

    At physiotherapist :
    Twice a week, ultrasound therapy, massage, magnetic pulse therapy, TENS and icing.

    I will take the advice posted by Agra Mainyu and train hamstrings for strength and flexibility. It seems to help.

    Any other suggestions are welcomed, always.

    Next thread: shoulder injuries!

  9. #29
    Flinch cant bench 350 lol Online Warlord's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Blaha's bulging red speedo View Post
    leg elevated with back of knee on a support, then tensing the leg and pushing the whole leg as to lower it towards the floor. First month every day, 2nd month with a small weight , 3rd month heavier weight!
    How exactly do you use weight in an exercise like this?

  10. #30
    Senior Member Jason Blaha's bulging red speedo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Online Warlord View Post
    How exactly do you use weight in an exercise like this?
    Those ankle weights. I don’t understand how the mechanics of this exercise will help the quadriceps tendon. It feels like it does something, though.

    I have the feeling the recovery will take many months. I’m thinking of using something more than physio to speed up the healing, but don’t know what. I read about BPC but I don’t believe it.

  11. #31
    Flinch cant bench 350 lol Online Warlord's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Blaha's bulging red speedo View Post
    Those ankle weights. I don’t understand how the mechanics of this exercise will help the quadriceps tendon. It feels like it does something, though.
    can you please explain this exercise to me again with more detail because I dont understand how an ankle weight will add resistance to pushing your leg down?

  12. #32
    Senior Member Jason Blaha's bulging red speedo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Online Warlord View Post
    can you please explain this exercise to me again with more detail because I dont understand how an ankle weight will add resistance to pushing your leg down?
    It looks like this:


    -You lie down on your back (or sit if you prefer) and place a support behind the affected knee. A large can of tomatoes can work, or a 5 lb medicine ball, for example.
    -Next, you straighten your leg while keeping the back of the knee resting on the support.
    -You pull your foot towards you. You don’t want your toes pointing away from you, you want to bring them towards you.
    -You tense up your whole leg and push downwards as if you wanted to lower it. You keep that tension for 10 seconds.
    -Rest. Repeat 10 times.
    -After a month, add ankle weight.

    When you add weight to your ankle, the resistance is on your extending your knee, not on the pushing downwards. I don’t understand what the pushing downward has to do with the quad, so I was also confused when the orthopedist explained the exercise. I’ll ask her to see if there is an explanation.

  13. #33
    Flinch cant bench 350 lol Online Warlord's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Blaha's bulging red speedo View Post
    It looks like this:


    -You lie down on your back (or sit if you prefer) and place a support behind the affected knee. A large can of tomatoes can work, or a 5 lb medicine ball, for example.
    -Next, you straighten your leg while keeping the back of the knee resting on the support.
    -You pull your foot towards you. You don’t want your toes pointing away from you, you want to bring them towards you.
    -You tense up your whole leg and push downwards as if you wanted to lower it. You keep that tension for 10 seconds.
    -Rest. Repeat 10 times.
    -After a month, add ankle weight.

    When you add weight to your ankle, the resistance is on your extending your knee, not on the pushing downwards. I don’t understand what the pushing downward has to do with the quad, so I was also confused when the orthopedist explained the exercise. I’ll ask her to see if there is an explanation.
    So basically youre doing a really short ROM single leg extension to a very short ROM hip extension? Ok now I got it.
    Obviously the downward movement isn't supposed to directly work the quadriceps muscles but maybe it's meant to create some type of a stretch effect based on the function of antagonist muscles, quad is composed of 4 different muscles and one of them, rectus femoris, acts on the flexion of the hip. In this exercise you're doing the opposite movement, the extension of the hip which comes from the hamstring muscles (which I dont remember the names of an am not gonna bother looking it up) so in order for the hip extensor muscles to contract and cause the extension of your hip, the hip flexor muscles must stretch out. The difference here compared to regular quad stretching is that your quad muscles are already in full contraction, which actually allows for a different type of stretch effect to happen. It's hard to explain but you can try to stretch some muscle in your body like say pectoral muscle but only hold the stretch for a few seconds, then flex the muscle as hard as you can for a few seconds and then stretch again and you should notice a certain degree of difference in your flexibility.

    but really I'm just speculating here based on the very little I know of physical therapy, ask the orthopedist and let me know how much I got it wrong

  14. #34
    Senior Member Jason Blaha's bulging red speedo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Online Warlord View Post
    So basically youre doing a really short ROM single leg extension to a very short ROM hip extension? Ok now I got it.
    It's exactly a very small leg extension that you keep for a while in isometric contraction.

    Obviously the downward movement isn't supposed to directly work the quadriceps muscles but maybe it's meant to create some type of a stretch effect based on the function of antagonist muscles,
    That's how I see it and feel it. Plus, the antagonistic effect reduces the hyperextension of the knee if you were to activate only the front of the leg.

    quad is composed of 4 different muscles and one of them, rectus femoris, acts on the flexion of the hip. In this exercise you're doing the opposite movement, the extension of the hip which comes from the hamstring muscles (which I dont remember the names of an am not gonna bother looking it up) so in order for the hip extensor muscles to contract and cause the extension of your hip, the hip flexor muscles must stretch out. The difference here compared to regular quad stretching is that your quad muscles are already in full contraction, which actually allows for a different type of stretch effect to happen. It's hard to explain but you can try to stretch some muscle in your body like say pectoral muscle but only hold the stretch for a few seconds, then flex the muscle as hard as you can for a few seconds and then stretch again and you should notice a certain degree of difference in your flexibility.
    I like that you specified this. It's how I usually stretch my muscles. I start slowly and when I feel the tightness, I activate the muscle to go a bit further. A physiotherapist had explained that to me and I find it's something not many people seem to put into practice.

    Other than that, I think the key to recovery is definitely isometric tension. It seems to remove the pain and allow you to do other movements.


 
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